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THE LANDSCAPES WITHIN

Wow! Just freaking wow!

And can you just imagine what you could encode in these puppies?

Also by way of fiction and/or gaming, just imagine a book you could open that would create either magically interactive landscapes such as these or holoconic/holographic ones that you could explore or further encode or explore…

By the way I now highly recommend the blog Colossal.

 

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramée sculpture paper books

Artist Guy Laramee (previously) has recently completed a number of new sculptural works where he transforms thick tomes into incredible topographical features including mountains, caves, volcanoes, and even water. Many of the works are part of a new project titled Guan Yin, a series of work dedicated to the forces that enable individuals to endure grief and pain, or in his words “the mysterious forces thanks to which we can traverse ordeals.” If you happen to be near Quebec, a number of Laramee’s works are currently on view at Expression gallery in Saint-Hyacinthe through August 12.

Update: You can also see a number of works by Laramée at Foster/White Gallery in Seattle.

THE WIZARD’S STAFF

The man is quite skilled. I like his work.

A Gramary of Art

staff14

I’ve been carving staffs since I was eight years old. I’ve spent many happy days hunting for suitable trees. Searching through the hills, rooting through thickets, lying on my back with my cheek against a sapling sighting it’s trunk for straightness.

staff15

It’s not easy to find the right sapling for a staff, it has to be a good hardwood like maple or beech or oak, and it must be straight and have a good root bowl.

When I find a tree that’s just right I begin digging down into its roots with my fingers, often chipping my nails on small stones in the rocky soil. I have a short saw with me, a hand axe, and garden sheers. I snip the smaller roots and saw through the big tap root. I prize the tree from the ground. With my hand axe, I trim the branches and cut the crown. The feeling of having found a good staff is the same as the hunter coming home with supper.

Last week I carved a wizard’s staff to go along with the dagger I’m working on. I carved it from a maple sapling. I was inspired by some of the artifacts I saw at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford UK, and also by my friend Professor Ari Berk‘s amazing study. Professor Berk’s subterranean lair is like the Pitt Rivers if someone tried to fit it into a much smaller space and it had a genuine wizard living in it (but without the mummified babies)…

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