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GODSLAYER

How to destroy gods

In the year 1168 a Danish bishop destroyed three pagan gods. The story is told in Gesta Danorum, by Saxo Grammaticus, which has recently been entirely translated into English for the first time.

Bishop Absalon topples the god Svantevit at Arkona - created by Laurits Tuxen (1853–1927)

Saxo Grammaticus was a Danish cleric and historian who around the year 1188 began writing the first full history of Denmark. Stretched over 16 books, the Gesta Danorum goes back to the time before Jesus Christ to relate the mythological beginnings of the Danes. It has long been popular reading for the tales and legends it gives relating to the pagan past of this region, as well as for covering the rise of important leaders such as Cnut the Great.

As it moves into the twelfth century, the focus of the work concentrates on the rule by various Danish kings, most notably Valdemar I, who was King from 1146 to 1182. While Denmark had long been a Christian country, some of its neighbours in the Baltic Sea region were still pagan, including the Wends, a people who inhabited the island of Rügen, which lies just off the coast of northeastern Germany.

After years of pirate attacks by the Wends, King Valdemar was persuaded by Absalon, the Bishop of Roskilde and the chief royal advisor, to launch a crusade against the people. In the year 1168 the Danes landed on Rügen and besieged the capital city of Arkona. Once Valdemar’s forces set fire to the walls and buildings of the city, the residents of Arkona made a deal to surrender.

Once King Valdemar took control of Arkona and received hostages from the leaders of the Wendish people, he ordered the statue of local deity a god named Svantevit. Saxon writes that the men:

found themselves unable to wrest it from its position without the use of axes; they therefore first tore down the curtains which veiled the shrine,  and then commanded their servants to deal swiftly with the business of hacking down the statue; however,  they were careful to warn their men to exercise caution in dismantling such a huge bulk, lest they should be crushed by its weight and be thought to have suffered punishment from the malevolent deity. Meanwhile a massive throng of townsfolk ringed the temple, hoping that Svantevit would pursue the instigators of these outrages with his strong, supernatural retribution.

After much work, the men cut down the statue:

With a gigantic crash the idol tumbled to earth. The swarths of purple drapery which hung about the sanctuary certainly glittered, but were so rotten with decay that they could not survive touching. The sanctum also contained the prodigious horns of wild animals, astonishing no less in themselves than in their ornamentation. A devil was seen departing from the inmost shrine in the guise of a black animal, until it disappeared abruptly from the gaze of bystanders.

While the god in Arkona was being destroyed, the Danes received word from the people of Karenz – another important town on the island – they were ready to surrender. Absalon traveled to the town along with 30 men, where they were met by 6000 warriors. However, the Wends prostrated themselves to the Christians and welcome the bishop.

Karenz was the home to three pagan deities – Rugevit, Porevit and Porenut – which were believed to be the gods of war, lightning and thunder. Bishop Absalon came to destroy these gods, and Saxo Grammaticus (who may have been an eyewitness) describes the scene of coming across the the first of the three pagan temples:

The largest shrine was surrounded by its own forecourt, but both spaces were enclosed with purple hangings instead of walls, while the roof gable rested only on pillars. Therefore out attendants tore down the curtains adorning the entrance area and eventually laid hands on the inner veils of the sanctuary. Once these had been removed, an idol made of oak, which they called Rugevit, lay open to the gaze from every quarter, wholly grotesque in its ugliness. For swallows, having built their nests beneath the features of its face, had piled  the dirt of their droppings  all over its chest. A fine deity, indeed, when its image was fouled so revoltingly by birds! Furthermore, in its head were set seven human faces, all contained under the surface of a single scalp. The sculptor had also provided the same number of real swords in scabbards, which hung on a belt at its side, while an eighth was held brandished in its right hand. The weapon had been inserted into its fists, to which an iron nail had clamped it with so firm a grip that it could not be wrenched away without severing the hand; this was the very pretext needed for lopping it off. In thickness the idol exceeded the width of a human frame, and its height was such that Absalon, standing on the toes of its feet, could hardly reach its chin with the small battleaxe he used to carry.

The men of Karenz had believed this to be the god of war, as though it were endowed with the strength of Mars. Nothing about the effigy was pleasant to look at, for its lineaments were misshapen and repulsive because of the crude carving.

Bishop Absalon soon ordered his men to begin destroying the gods:

Every citizen was possessed by sheer panic when our henchmen began to apply their hatchets to its lower legs. As soon as these had been cut through, the trunk fell, hitting the ground with a loud crash. Once the townsfolk beheld this sight, they scoffed at their god’s power and contemptuously forsook the object of their veneration.

Not satisfied with its demolition, Absalon’s workforce now stretched their hands all the more eagerly towards the image of Porevit, worshipped in the temple close by. On it were implanted five heads, though it had been fashioned without weapons. After that effigy had been brought down, they assailed the sacred precinct of Porenut. Its statue displayed four faces and a fifth was inserted in its breast, with its left hand touching the forehead, its right the chin. Here again the attendants did good service, chopping at the figure with their axes until it toppled.

After the idols had been broken, the Danish bishop wanted to inflict a more permanent destruction on the pagan gods:

Absalon then issued a proclamation that the citizens must burn these idols the city, but they immediately opposed his command with entreaties, begging him to take pity on their overcrowded city and not expose them to fire after he had spared their throats. If the flames crept to the surrounding area and caught hold of one of the huts, the dense concentration of buildings would undoubtedly cause the whole mass to go up in smoke. For this reason they were bidden to drag the statues out of town, but for a long time the people resisted, continuing to plead religion as their excuse for defying the edict; they feared that the supernatural forces would exact vengeance and cause them to lose the use of those limbs they had employed to carry out the order. In the end Absalon taught them by his admonitions to make light of a god who had not power enough to rise to his own defence, once they had become confident of being immune from punishment, the citizens were quick to obey his directions.

As the remains of the pagan gods were being dragged away, Sven of Arhus, another bishop who came with Absalon, added insult to injury:

So that he might show them the idols deserved disdain, Sven made it his business to stand high on top of them while the men of Karenz were heaving them away. In so doing he added affront by increasing the weight and harassed the pullers as much with humiliation as with the extra burden, when they viewed their deities in residence lying beneath the feet of a foreign bishop.

As this was being done, Bishop Absalon went about preparing the area to be Christian. He first consecrated three burial sites in the countryside just outside Karenz, and after celebrating a mass baptized the people. Saxo then adds, “Likewise by constructing churches in a large number of localities, they exchanged the dens of an esoteric superstition for the edifices of public religion.”

The island of Rugen came to accept Christianity – and Danish rule. Bishop Absalon would become the Archbishop of Lund in 1178, serving until his death in 1201. Saxo Grammaticus would finish his Gesta Danorum in the early thirteenth-century, covering his account of Denmark’s history up to year 1185.

Gesta Danorum: The History of the Danes, has been edited and translated by Karsten Friis-Jensen and Peter Fisher and was published in two volumes earlier this year by Oxford University Press. Click here to visit the publisher’s website for more details.

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO SEE – ALLTHING

Everything You Need To See From This Year’s San Diego Comic-Con

ON THE MEND

I have been noticeably absent from blogging lately due to a series of very unfortunate vents. First I had a severe stomach virus, then I had to have a wisdom tooth removed, and then in an accident I broke my wrist severely enough I had to have corrective surgery.

Nevertheless I am out of the cast now and undergoing rehabilitation. And although typing with my wrist is still very difficult and sometimes painful I’m on the mend.

So please excuse my absence.

I am returning this week.

SUPERGIRL – ALL-THING

I think my wife and daughters will like this. I’m not sure I won’t.

 

ROGUE ONE

I’ll be on a working vacation next week. So I won’t have much time to post.

But when I find good things I will.

TOP 10 SWORDS

Top 10 Most Famous Swords of the Middle Ages

Though I would have included different swords in a couple of instances not a bad list at all.

‘WARE THE SKOT AND THE SKOTLANDS

Vikings ‘were warned to avoid Scotland’

Scotland is full of dangerous natives who speak an incomprehensible language and the is weather awful. That was the verdict of a series of 13th century Viking travel guides that warned voyagers to visit at their peril.

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Vikings on street: Vikings 'were warned to avoid Scotland'

Revellers at the Up Helly Aa Fire Festival in Shetland Photo: GETTY

The medieval chronicles, set down on yellowed calf vellum eight centuries ago, describe Scotland – or Skotland, as it was known – as an unwelcome and inhospitable country offering rewards only to the bold.

“Icelanders who want to practise robbery are advised to go there,” says one saga. “But it may cost them their life.”

Another saga tells the story of Icelandic merchants who sailed into a west coast sea loch where they met 13 ships bristling with what they called “Vikings” – more an occupation than a nationality – but were actually natives.

A Scot identified in the saga as Grjotgard, a kinsman of Melkolf, king of Scotland (Malcolm II), told them: “You have two choices. You can go ashore and we will take all your property, or we’ll attack you and kill every man we lay our hands on.” The merchants were terrified, the saga says, but presumably lived to tell their tale.

The chronicles have been interpreted by Gisli Sigurdsson, a historian at Reykjavik University, who believes the sagas – part fiction, part fact – reveal how the ancient Norse were far from the fearless pirates of legend.

As the Norsemen became as keen on trade as marauding, they were particularly nervous about sailing up the west coast sea lochs they referred to as the “Scottish fjords”. “The only places the Norse could have expected a safe reception was Orkney and Shetland, where the people were basically the same as them and where they would be greeted as kin,” Mr Sigurdsson said.

The Norse Viking age peaked between the 9th and 12th centuries, when Scandinavian seafarers conquered new lands, settling Orkney, Shetland, Iceland and Greenland, and establishing colonies in Scotland, England, Ireland, France, North America and Russia.

The Icelandic sagas, written in the 13th century but based on earlier oral stories, were often used as route guides for raiders, traders, crusaders and explorers, effectively a road map of medieval Europe and the Middle East. They have proved remarkably accurate, even helping archaeologists to pinpoint the remains of a Norse village in Newfoundland.

Orkney is described as a handy base camp for pillaging Scotland. But the Norse had other bases too, some of which would feature high up in a modern guide for tourists. If you are planning to raid Scotland, one saga reads, you could do worse than base yourself in Fort Skardaborg. That’s today’s Scarborough.

Mr Sigurdsson believes the Norse Vikings were particularly nervous about the Gaels of Ireland and west Scotland.

Orkney historian Tom Muir said: “They picked weak targets, like monasteries. Some of the monasteries were basically unguarded banks of cash with a sign above them saying ‘free money’. The truth is that there were raids both ways and that the Norse had every reason to fear their Celtic neighbours. There are well-documented accounts of Gaelic-speaking Lewismen raiding Orkney.”

The Norse eventually lost their hold in Scotland. But Celts and the Vikings must ultimately have started to get along. DNA evidence suggests many Scots and Icelanders interbred and settled in both countries.

CAIRNS OF THE DEAD

Excellent gaming and story background materials.

 

Forgotten monuments of Northern Sweden

The larger of the Spir Mountain Cairns from NW. Photo by Carl L. Thunberg 2014-06-26. (CC BY-NC)

The larger of the Spir Mountain Cairns from NW. Photo by Carl L. Thunberg 2014-06-26. (CC BY-NC)

Carl L. Thunberg
Carl L. Thunberg is a Swedish archaeologist and historian, born in Stockholm 1963, with master’s degrees completed at the Universities of Gothenburg and Uppsala. His two main areas of specialisation are ancient Scandinavian monuments and the transitional period between the Viking Age and the Nordic Middle Ages. Academia Page

The Spir Mountain cairns are located near to the Swedish city of Örnsköldsvik in Norrland. These two exceptionally well preserved Early Bronze Age cairns are arguably the finest examples of this region, and aesthetically, they are equal to the best prehistoric monuments that Sweden has to offer.

The Spir Mountain; the view in a southeasterly direction. Photo by Carl L. Thunberg 2014-06-26. (CC BY-NC)

Forgotten monuments in a wild landscape

Norrland’s ancient monuments are often – in comparison to southern Sweden – relatively inaccessible, and to reach these particular examples one must climb a rugged mountain covered with pine trees.

In the main, the information concerning the most northerly Swedish prehistoric sites is outdated, and was brought together in the 19th and early 20th centuries (e.g. Ekdahl 1827-1830; Sidenbladh 1864, 1867, 1868; Olsson 1911, 1914). However, these inventories are often the only references available, as can be seen from the FMIS system of the Swedish National Heritage Board.

Monuments to the dead

Map over the Spir Mountain (Spirberget) with the cairns marked. Through the FMIS system by Carl L. Thunberg 2015-02-28. (CC BY-NC)

The vast majority of the cairns appear to have been built as monuments to the dead, mainly during the southern Scandinavian Bronze Age; circa 1800-500 BC. They occupy prominent positions overlooking the surrounding area, and some researchers speculate that they had a function as tribal markers for family group territories (Baudou 1959, 1968; Burenhult et al 1999).

Unlike the cairns from the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age which appear to contain cremation burials, the Early Bronze Age examples like one of the Spir Mountain cairns (RAÄ Grundsunda 109:1), have internal burial chambers with cists containing skeletal remains, accompanied by various grave goods. In some cases the cairns have been used repeatedly, and have been expanded out from their original structures (ibid).

Many of the cairns were constructed near or overlooking what was once the sea shore; some 30-50 metres above present sea level (ibid), and it is interesting to note that Spir Mountain had once been an island within a bay during the Bronze Age.

Norrland’s coastal cairn-zone is usually considered to extend from northern Uppland to Piteå in Norrbotten, a distance of about 860 kilometres. The coastal cairn-zone in Ångermanland is particularly rich, and includes about 700 registered sites.

Carl L. Thunberg by the larger of the Spir Mountain Cairns. Photo Sven Käll 2014-06-26. (CC BY-NC)

Two remarkable structures

During the investigations of prehistoric sites in Ångermanland, the project reached the Spir Mountain and its cairns in 2013. The first visit was an overwhelming experience, standing before two remarkable structures of dry stone masonry with spectacular views across the surrounding landscape. The larger of the cairns (13m in diameter) is exceptionally well preserved, and almost perfectly circular. The stone required for construction must have required an immense investment of labour. The smaller cairn is just to the east and is 6m in diameter.

There are few known settlements that can be associated with the coastal cairns, but it is likely that the area’s inhabitants must have had an economy based on fishing and seal hunting (Baudou 1968). In Västernorrland there are cairns dating from the Earlier Bronze Age through to the Iron Age, with some still in use as late as the Viking Age, long after the tradition disappeared in many other places in Sweden and other parts of Scandinavia (Baudou 1959, 1968; George & Vinberg 2006).

Although the groups of coastal cairns in Norrland, with their contextual continuity, must represent the cultural remnants of a resident population, until further modern research takes place in this landscape it is difficult to fully interpret the sites and identify the cultures that created them.


Link to map and satellite photoshttp://www.hitta.se/karta/partner?s=014c725f

Link to the archaeological search engine of FMIS: http://www.fmis.raa.se/cocoon/fornsok/search.html

Link to the RAÄ page for Carl L. Thunberg and the Spirmountain Cairns: http://www.raa.se/aktuellt/vara-evenemang/arkeologidagen/till-arrangemangen/angermanland/spirbergsrosena-en-majestatisk-fornlamningsplats-i-ornskoldsvik/

Link to Carl L. Thunberg’s Academia.edu page: http://gu-se.academia.edu/CarlLThunberg

References

  • Baudou, E. 1959. Till frågan om de norrländska kuströsenas datering. Fornvännen: Journal of Swedish Antiquarian Research (1959): 161-176. KVHAA.
  • Baudou, E. 1968. Forntida bebyggelse i Ångermanlands kustland. Arkeologiska undersökningar av ångermanländska kuströsen. Arkiv för norrländsk hembygdsforskning XVII. Härnösand.
  • Burenhult, G (ed.). 1999. Arkeologi i Norden. Bokförlaget Natur & Kultur. Stockholm.
  • George, O. & Vinberg, A. 2006. Arkeologisk undersökning av gravröse vid Älandsfjärden. Rapport 2006:10. Länsmuseet Västernorrland & RAÄ. Härnösand.
  • Ekdahl, N. J. 1827-1830. Berättelse till Kongl. Witterhets, Historie och Antiqvitets Academien om de Wettenskapliga Forskningsresor, som blifvit företagna åren 1827, 1828, 1829, 1830 i Norrland … (etc). Antikvarisk-topografiska arkivet: N. J. Ekdahls samlingar.
  • Olsson, E. 1911. Berättelse öfver arkeologiska undersökningar i Ångermanland. KVHAA.
  • Olsson, E. 1914. Översikt av de fasta fornlämningarna i Ångermanland. Fornvännen: Journal of Swedish Antiquarian Research (1914): 49-80. KVHAA.
  • Sidenbladh, K. 1864. Några fornminnen i Norra Ångermanland, antecknade sommaren 1864 av Karl Sidenbladh Phil.stud.Norrl. KVHAA.
  • Sidenbladh, K. 1867. Berättelse till Kongl. Witterhets, Historie och Antiqvitets Akademin om de antikvariska undersökningar gjorda under 1867. KVHAA.
  • Sidenbladh, K. 1868. Fornlemningar i Ångermanland och Medelpad 1864-1868. KVHAA.

HANG SON SOONG

Amazing…

Can you imagine both the Real World and fictional adventure and exploration possibilities? I can.

see link to article for original video.

An Aerial Tour of ‘Hang Son Soong,’ the Largest Cave on Earth

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In this new 6-minute film, cave, adventure, and travel photographer Ryan Deboodt takes us on a breathtaking aerial tour of the world’s largest cave, Hang Son Doong, located in central Vietnam. Deboodt brought a drone and an array of cameras to help capture the cave system, the largest chamber of which is 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) long, 200 meters (660 ft) high and 150 meters (490 ft) wide. Despite its enormity, the cave was only discovered in 1991 by a local man, and it wasn’t even studied by scientists until about five years ago. One of the most disorienting thing about watching Deboodt’s film was my brain not comprehending the scale of what I was looking at. It’s only once you notice the ant-like people walking through some of the shots that you realize just how massive this place is. You can see more of Deboodt’s cave photography on Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

MILITARY ANTIQUITIES

William Roy’s ‘Military Antiquities of the Romans in North Britain’ (1793) Online

Jan 30, 2015

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William Roy’s ‘Military Antiquities of the Romans in North Britain’ (1793) is a classic work on the military conquest of Scotland by the Romans.

Plan shewing the course of the Roman wall called Grime's Dyke? - from NLS website

One of the earliest detailed descriptions of Roman antiquities in Scotland, with 51 map plates and 174 pages of supporting text.

This website is a complete electronic facsimile of the original. Many newly-discovered Roman remains were recorded in the volume for the first time. As a record of early archaeology in Scotland and of related topographical information regarding Roman sites, it can never be entirely superseded.

Its author, William Roy, is better known for his work on the Military Survey of Scotland (1747-1755), and in founding what became the Ordnance Survey, but he was also a keen antiquarian and man of science, and this splendid volume is also a lasting monument to these interests.

http://maps.nls.uk/roy/antiquities/index.html

INCOMPLETE

 

For the rest of this week I will not be posting any original content to this blog or any of my blogs. Recently, due to my work schedule and other obligations, I have had very little time to work on the overall construction and the technical aspects of my blog(s). I had planned to complete those aspects of my blogs long ago but other things kept interfering.

So this week I have decided to spend the entire week finishing my originally conceived construction-plans of my blogs to make it easier for agents, fellow game designers, publishers, writers, and others to find me and to communicate and work with me.

To that end I will spend the rest of the week finishing my original plans and retooling this site.

As I said, as it stands now I plan to add no more original content this week so as to finally finish my original designs without interruption or any more delays.

However you can still find a great deal of useful content in the various Categories already present on this blog, and on the Categories of all of my other blogs. Just pick the categories that interest you and browse at will. Uncategorized will allow you to find everything.

I will also be sharing useful articles, content, and posts I find on other sites as I run across them and time allows. But most of my time this week will be spent on blog development.

Thank you for being a Reader and Follower of my blogs, I appreciate your patronage and hope you find my blogs enjoyable, entertaining, and most especially, useful.

NATURALLY OCCURRING

WALKING BACK IN

Rick and his gang take aim in the woods in new teaser for The Walking Dead’s fifth season 

Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln) and his gang of survivors take aim in the just-released teaser for The Walking Dead’s fifth season.

In the slow-motion preview, which premiered Friday, the hardened former sheriff’s deputy brandished a rifle in a chilly Atlanta forest.

‘Surviving together is all that matters,’ Rick says in the voiceover.

Scroll down for video 

Resuming on February 8! Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln) and his gang of survivors take aimin the just-released teaser for The Walking Dead's fifth season

Resuming on February 8! Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln) and his gang of survivors take aim in the just-released teaser for The Walking Dead’s fifth season

His right-hand man Daryl Dixon (Norman Reedus) wielded two different weapons – a shotgun and his trusty crossbow.

The formidable Carol Peletier (Melissa McBride) readied her knuckle-grip knife for lurking walkers in the woods.

Michonne (Danai Gurira) grimaced as she raised her trusty katana at more unseen enemies – dead or otherwise.

The Walking Dead Season 5 trailer: returns Sunday Feb 8th

'Surviving together is all that matters': In the slow-motion preview, which premiered Friday, the hardened former sheriff's deputy brandished a rifle in a chilly Atlanta forest

‘Surviving together is all that matters’: In the slow-motion preview, which premiered Friday, the hardened former sheriff’s deputy brandished a rifle in a chilly Atlanta forest

Two is better than one: His right-hand man Daryl Dixon (Norman Reedus) wielded two different weapons - a shotgun and his trusty crossbow

Two is better than one: His right-hand man Daryl Dixon (Norman Reedus) wielded two different weapons – a shotgun and his trusty crossbow

She's come a long way: The formidable Carol Peletier (Melissa McBride) readied her knuckle-grip knife for lurking walkers in the woods

She’s come a long way: The formidable Carol Peletier (Melissa McBride) readied her knuckle-grip knife for lurking walkers in the woods

Samurai of the apocalypse: Michonne (Danai Gurira) grimaced as she raised her trusty katana at more unseen enemies - dead or otherwise

Samurai of the apocalypse: Michonne (Danai Gurira) grimaced as she raised her trusty katana at more unseen enemies – dead or otherwise

Glenn Rhee (Steven Yeun) clutched a dagger as the gang, including his fiancée Maggie (Lauren Cohan), hunted.

Tyreese Williams (Chad Coleman) bounded down a hillside with a rifle on his back through the foggy forest.

His sister Sasha (Sonequa Martin-Green) carefully listened for any disruptions in the eerie stillness.

Love still survives: Glenn Rhee (Steven Yeun) clutched a dagger as the gang, including his fiancée Maggie (Lauren Cohan), hunted

Love still survives: Glenn Rhee (Steven Yeun) clutched a dagger as the gang, including his fiancée Maggie (Lauren Cohan), hunted

Non-violent at heart: Tyreese Williams (Chad Coleman) bounded down a hillside with a rifle on his back through the foggy forest

Non-violent at heart: Tyreese Williams (Chad Coleman) bounded down a hillside with a rifle on his back through the foggy forest

Paranoia or panic? His sister Sasha (Sonequa Martin-Green) carefully listened for any disruptions in the eerie stillness

Paranoia or panic? His sister Sasha (Sonequa Martin-Green) carefully listened for any disruptions in the eerie stillness

Sergeant Abraham Ford (Michael Cudlitz) warily peered through the scope of his automatic rifle.

Confessed fraud Eugene Porter (Josh McDermitt) armed himself with a tiny knife alongside gun-wielding gals Tara (Alanna Masterson) and Rosita (Christian Serratos).

Porter’s false claims that he could deliver a cure to Washington, D.C. for the zombie outbreak derailed the entire group’s plans this season.

Ginger thunder: Sergeant Abraham Ford (Michael Cudlitz) warily peered through the scope of his automatic rifle

Ginger thunder: Sergeant Abraham Ford (Michael Cudlitz) warily peered through the scope of his automatic rifle

Stay behind the ladies: Confessed fraud Eugene Porter (Josh McDermitt) armed himself with a tiny knife alongside gun-wielding gals Tara (Alanna Masterson) and Rosita (Christian Serratos)

Stay behind the ladies: Confessed fraud Eugene Porter (Josh McDermitt) armed himself with a tiny knife alongside gun-wielding gals Tara (Alanna Masterson) and Rosita (Christian Serratos)

Thanks, Eugene: For the first time since the show began in 2010, Rick and his gang are loose in the woods with absolutely no shelter

Thanks, Eugene: For the first time since the show began in 2010, Rick and his gang are loose in the woods with absolutely no shelter

For the first time since the show began in 2010, Rick and his gang are loose in the woods with absolutely no shelter.

Not seen in the one-minute trailer were Rick’s children – son Carl (Chandler Riggs) and daughter Judith aka ‘Little Asskicker’ (Charlotte & Clara Ward).

The Walking Dead’s just-released poster prominently features the discarded map Abraham gave Rick outlining their abandoned plans for D.C.

It’s the same map Rick’s old friend Morgan Jones (Lennie James) picked up during the midseason finale – hinting at a reunion.

Where were the kids? Not seen in the one-minute trailer were Rick’s children – daughter Judith aka ‘Little Asskicker’ (Charlotte & Clara Ward) and son Carl (Chandler Riggs)

So much for a cure: The Walking Dead's just-released poster prominently features the discarded map Abraham gave Rick outlining their abandoned plans for Washington, D.C.

So much for a cure: The Walking Dead’s just-released poster prominently features the discarded map Abraham gave Rick outlining their abandoned plans for Washington, D.C.

Season 1 standout: It's the same map Rick's old friend Morgan Jones (Lennie James) picked up during the midseason finale - hinting at a reunion

Season 1 standout: It’s the same map Rick’s old friend Morgan Jones (Lennie James) picked up during the midseason finale – hinting at a reunion

Sexual tension: Beth Greene's senseless death during the finale was shocking, but it did open the show up for a possible romantic relationship between Carol and Daryl

Sexual tension: Beth Greene’s senseless death during the finale was shocking, but it did open the show up for a possible romantic relationship between Carol and Daryl

Beth Greene’s senseless death during the finale was shocking, but it did open the show up for a possible romantic relationship between Carol and Daryl.

Now in its sixth year, The Walking Dead is beloved by critics and it’s scored two Emmy awards and one Golden Globe nomination.

The post-apocalyptic drama was developed by Frank Darabont based on the 2003 Robert Kirkman comic book.

The 16-episode fifth season of The Walking Dead resumes February 8 and airs Sundays through March 29 on AMC.

The Walking Dead returns in February: Watch the trailer

Hit show: Now in its sixth year, The Walking Dead is beloved by critics and it's scored two Emmy awards and one Golden Globe nomination

Hit show: Now in its sixth year, The Walking Dead is beloved by critics and it’s scored two Emmy awards and one Golden Globe nomination

Weee! The 16-episode fifth season of The Walking Dead resumes February 8 and airs Sundays through March 29 on AMC

Weee! The 16-episode fifth season of The Walking Dead resumes February 8 and airs Sundays through March 29 on AMC

ONE IF BY LAND… THE TIME CAPSULE

Paul Revere’s 1795 time capsule unearthed

By Todd Leopold and Kevin Conlon, CNN
updated 7:41 AM EST, Fri December 12, 2014
Source: WCVB

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Workers fixing a leak at the State House discover nearly 220-year-old time capsule
  • Capsule was buried in 1795 by Paul Revere, Sam Adams
  • Contents will be revealed next week

(CNN) — A time capsule buried by patriots Samuel Adams and Paul Revere more than two centuries ago was unearthed Thursday in Boston.

The box-shaped capsule was placed by the Revolutionary-era duo in a cornerstone of the Massachusetts State House in 1795, the year construction began on the building, CNN affiliate WBZ reported.

When current-day workers repairing a water leak found the hidden antique, they called in a local expert from the Museum of Fine Arts who spent the better part of Thursday delicately and painstakingly chipping away at the cornerstone trying to extricate it.

“What we know the box contains, based on the notes that we have, is a Paul Revere plate, papers, and coins from the 1600s,” said Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvin, who also heads the state’s historical commission. “It may contain other stuff too, we don’t know that yet,” he said.

Galvin told CNN that the capsule’s contents are expected to be revealed sometime next week. For now, it’s getting some TLC and a thorough exam — including X-rays — by the museum’s staff.

“The contents are of concern, but the plaster that held the box in place is in good condition,” he said.

This is not the first time this particular capsule was unearthed, according to Galvin. In 1855 it was dug up during emergency repairs to the State House and put back in place when the cornerstone was reset.

Extra precautions were taken then to ensure the box’s safekeeping.

“There were some coins that were tossed in the 1855 ceremony in the mix of the mortar. They are in good condition so we are optimistic that the box itself has withstood the test of time and that it will therefore be holding the contents securely,” Galvin said.

Galvin says both time-capsule events — in 1795 and in1855 — were chronicled in detail, and said his office is looking into whether the box will be reinstated and whether new items from the current era will be added to the box and reburied.

113-year-old time capsule found in Boston

CNN’s Carma Hassan contributed to this story.

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