Bone Valley

I must explore this…

Abandoned Southeast

IMG_5943.JPG These roads are no longer traveled by man.

Millions of years ago, the coast of Florida was believed to be 60 miles further inland. In the 1890s, Smithsonian archaeologists discovered large amounts of fossils in prehistoric sea beds across central Florida. After the fossil discovery, the region 40 miles South of Orlando became known as Bone Valley.

22532469919_8612aa2aa6_k.jpg The abandoned processing plant in 2015.

The prehistoric sea floor was located 25 feet below the surface. It was encompassed in a phosphate matrix comprised of animal bone, sand, and clay. Scientists knew that the phosphate surrounding the fossils made a great fertilizer. However, it wasn’t until the 1960s that phosphate fertilizers became chemically enhanced, increasing crop yields tremendously.

22532676649_9f2ef6f6f7_k A view of the abandoned phosphate drying facility.

Throughout the turn of the century, the Bone Valley region boomed as a dozen commercial mining companies moved to the region from the North. Early miners worked by hand using only a pickaxe…

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About Jack

BRIEF BIO: Jack Gunter is a writer of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and songs. He is the co-owner of Open Door Communications, a copywriter, an inventor, and a former broker and private investigator. He is a naturalist and an amateur scientist and cryptologist. He likes to compose music and to design and play games and puzzles of all types. He homeschooled his children. He lives in the Upstate of South Carolina with his beautiful wife, talented two daughters, his old friend and Great Dane Sam, and his three Viking Cats.

Posted on June 15, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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