The Punic Wars – Part Two

Excellent Work, as usual.

The Herodotus History Blog

In the last post, we saw the Romans embarrass the Carthaginians at sea, make progress on land and you could be forgiven for thinking that the war will soon be over.

But the year is 260 BC, and there are twenty more years of bloodshed to go before the end of this war. So, what happened? What stopped Rome from claiming a quick victory?

The answer is a man named Hamilcar. This is NOT, by the way, the famous father of the even more famous Hannibal, but a different Hamilcar entirely. Unfortunately for historians it was quite a popular name among ancient Carthaginians.

CARTHAGE STRIKES BACK

iberian swordsman An Iberian soldier, of the type the Carthaginians hired in large numbers

Hamilcar was an infantry commander in a culture that valued sailors. It is easy to imagine that he was consistently looked down on by his fellows for his focus on land warfare…

View original post 3,808 more words

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About Jack

BRIEF BIO: Jack Gunter is a writer of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and songs. He is the co-owner of Open Door Communications, a copywriter, an inventor, and a former broker and private investigator. He is a naturalist and an amateur scientist and cryptologist. He likes to compose music and to design and play games and puzzles of all types. He homeschooled his children. He lives in the Upstate of South Carolina with his beautiful wife, talented two daughters, his old friend and Great Dane Sam, and his three Viking Cats.

Posted on June 5, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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