The Punic Wars – Part One

The Herodotus History Blog

There are some conflicts which forever change the course of history, which have massive, earth-shattering consequences millennia after they were fought. Both World Wars, the Napoleonic Wars and the Thirty Years’ War all probably count. But a series of wars that were fought far, far earlier arguably were the first conflicts for which this was true. These were the three wars between the two Mediterranean republics, Rome on the one side and Carthage on the other, and they determined not just which of the two powers dominated Mediterranean trade routes, but which of them would be the one whose language, culture, laws and mindset would go on to influence Europe for at least the next 2000 years.

I’ll start, as any logical person would, at the beginning, with the First Punic War. I’ll admit it, this is less interesting than the Second Punic War – that one has brilliant generals, enormous…

View original post 2,529 more words

Advertisements

About Jack

BRIEF BIO: Jack Gunter is a writer of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and songs. He is the co-owner of Open Door Communications, a copywriter, an inventor, and a former broker and private investigator. He is a naturalist and an amateur scientist and cryptologist. He likes to compose music and to design and play games and puzzles of all types. He homeschooled his children. He lives in the Upstate of South Carolina with his beautiful wife, talented two daughters, his old friend and Great Dane Sam, and his three Viking Cats.

Posted on May 23, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: