Historical Analysis – Mail and Plate, a comparison

The Renaissance Project

—Thought I’d try something different this time, adding on to the workshop posts, tapping into knowledge back in historical times on the interesting advances and adaptions of technology etc. This post will be dedicated to the comparison between Maile and Plate during 14th-16th Century. Note by any means this is not an extensive research, but an analysis from my findings from books, experience and the internet— 

Untitled-1

Pretty much sums it up how long it takes to make Maile. I know, I’m still working on it.

There has been a universal understanding that the transitional era where maile armour that was dorminant for almost two millenniums was inevitably replaced with a more rigid, economical, protective (and aesthetical dare I say) piece of technology that phased out the era of maile armour. One answer is simple rather, that plate armour’s strongest factor in dominating the European theatre of war near the 14th…

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About Jack

BRIEF BIO: Jack Gunter is a writer of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and songs. He is the co-owner of Open Door Communications, a copywriter, an inventor, and a former broker and private investigator. He is a naturalist and an amateur scientist and cryptologist. He likes to compose music and to design and play games and puzzles of all types. He homeschooled his children. He lives in the Upstate of South Carolina with his beautiful wife, talented two daughters, his old friend and Great Dane Sam, and his three Viking Cats.

Posted on August 19, 2015, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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